Unhealthy Sugar Packed and Caloric Overload Foods to Avoid

February 10, 2009

Label Reading

I hope you enjoyed my Tips on How to Avoid Hidden Sugar.

Now let me give you some examples of the most sugar packed foods.

I am sure there are some of them you will be surprised with.

Below are excerpts from the article “The Most Sugar-Packed Foods in America” by Dave Zinczenko and Matt Goulding published in the Men’s Health, Health and Fitness Section.

 

Most sugar-packed breakfast cerealSugar packed foods

Quaker Natural Granola: Oats, Honey & Raisins (1 cup)

  • 30 g sugars
  • 420 calories

Warning: Granola’s healthy reputation is way overrated. The problem is those healthy-sounding oats are invariably bathed in a variety of sweeteners, making it not only one of the sweetest cereals in the aisle, but also a caloric overload. In fact, one cup of this stuff has more sugar than two servings of Lucky Charms.

Most sugar-packed salad

Uno Chicago Grill’s Spinach, Chicken and Gorgonzola Salad

  • 38 g sugars
  • 720 calories

The candied walnuts on this salad help to make it sweeter than a double-scoop cone of Ben & Jerry’s Butter Pecan ice cream. Choose a more sensible meal and save the sugar calories for dessert (which you’ll share, right?).

Most sugar-packed side dish

Boston Market’s Cinnamon Apples

  • 42 g sugars
  • 210 calories

This apple dish is right up there with the one Eve served to Adam, and you know how that worked out. Boston Market’s sickly sweet side consists of apples overwhelmed with sugar, brown sugar, soybean oil, and cornstarch. Oh yeah, and a pinch of cinnamon—which is about the only healthy thing about it. If you want this dish done right, make it at home.

Most sugar-packed sandwich

Subway’s Foot-Long Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki

  • 38 g sugars
  • 740 calories

The most distressing part: this sandwich finds its way onto Subway’s “healthy” menu. Ignore the claims of low fat that adorn the menu board; the teriyaki sauce contributes nearly 10 teaspoons of sugar to the sandwich, which will soon find their way to your waistline.

Most sugar-packed “healthy” food

Panera’s Pumpkin Muffin

  • 47 g sugars
  • 530 calories

Stop thinking of muffins as health food and start thinking of them as cake. They’re made from refined flour, contain only trace amounts of fiber, and can pack more sugar than two ice cream bars. Have one of these for breakfast, and you’ve sabotaged your diet for the whole day.

Most sugar-packed kids’ meal

Oscar Mayer Maxed Out Turkey & Cheddar Cracker Combo Lunchables

  • 61 g sugars
  • 680 calories

Kids love Lunchables, and for the usual reason: It’s a candy box. Too bad so many busy parents use them to fill empty lunchboxes. But this kids’ meal has more calories than a Whopper and more sugar than two Snickers bars; suddenly, packing their lunches becomes more of a priority. Anything to avoid that prepackaged candy and sugary drink.

Most sugar-packed breakfast

Bob Evans’ Stacked & Stuffed Strawberry Banana Cream Hotcakes

  • 102 g sugars
  • 1,200 calories

Despite the fruity name, this is truly one of the worst breakfast entrées in America. Each stack has 25.5 teaspoons of sugar—that’s more sugar than six funnel cakes. This is their diabetic special—one that contributes to the disease, instead of curing it.

The most sugar-packed food in America

Baskin Robbins Large York® Peppermint Pattie Shake

  • 281 g sugars
  • 2,210 calories

Baskin Robbins’ line of candy-based beverages are horrendous on so many accounts: Each large shake has a day’s worth of calories, up to three day’s of saturated fat, and an ingredient list so long—some more than seven inches—it requires an advanced degree in chemistry to decipher. This particular caloric catastrophe has more sugar than 11 Peppermint Patties. read the whole article

 

I understand that it may be difficult to be sugar free. But we can at least be better choice smart, shall we?


Breathe, smile and be happy.

Irina Wardas, HHC

Women’s Holistic Health, Nutrition Coach and Relationship Expert

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